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Album Review: Orphans of Doom “Strange Worlds / Fierce Gods”

I am one of those people who live under a rock and need to desperately fix it. When I decided to look into what the local scene (or at least local to me) offered I found Orphans of Doom, and as an extra bonus they released a new album back in January. I went in search of it, and one purchase and download later have an album to review.

After I listened to the album I couldn’t help but feel this band was slightly familiar. I felt I had heard them in a basement show back in the day, so much so I checked my notes from that time just to make sure. Unfortunately it doesn’t seem to be the case, which doesn’t really bode well. They stay true to the stoner genre but so much so that if played with other bands like Kylesa in a playlist I don’t feel I could pick them out unless they were very particular songs (more on that in a moment). That aside those who absolutely love the genre will find the tug of war between ambient, alternating slow and driving tempos, and spoken word. Songs that really stick out in this regard are “Excension” and “Harvest”.

I will give Orphans of Doom credit there are particular songs where they deviate from typical stoner genre fanfare and delve more into prog. Songs like “Kakegoe” and “Cephalopod” really explore more extreme ends, be it experimenting with ambient to induce a further dreamlike state or driving rhythms reminiscent of traditional Japanese drumming to induce frenzy. I think exploring those concepts further and exploring musical transitions more to develop those ideas will set it apart from other stoner music I’ve heard.

There are times, however, the experimentation isn’t quite realized in the song. Part of this may be because the transition between powerful drumming and ambient isn’t really developed or doesn’t exist so the jump between the two ends up awkward. Moments of “Cephalopod” are like this, which is a shame because what should lull the listener deeper into the song as if entering the realm of the eponymous creature ends up jarring and awkward. I also see this in “The Return of Supertoad” albeit the transitions and tempos are still awkward at times though more thought is put into transitions than on other tracks. There are times, however, the union between the concept and what’s actualized in the song don’t work out entirely. I felt “Mythical Sleep” epitomized this. It didn’t really make sense and I couldn’t tell if this was a calculated move or not and, if so, what purpose it served. It seemed like more about bravado of technical skill than artistic integrity. When it does come together, though, I feel like there’s promise. The best examples are “Ghosts” and “Pleasure Delayer”, where the “diddling” ends up being the theme and transition that brings the song together.

Overall I think Orphans of Doom has potential, but they will need to find their voice a bit more and commit to it. I see moments where they want to take their sound into a more prog direction and certainly have the skill but it’s drowned out by desire to adhere to the stoner genre in a way that I’m unsure behooves them. It ultimately creates a sound that is muddled and can seem too focused on what may sound cool, but not necessarily come together cohesively. I think those into the genre will appreciate it for what it is and enjoy the album for its aesthetics.



Elantris Review: “This Sacrifice”

Well folks, I’m back in the saddle again and I’m finally reviewing again. What better way to ease back into things than an album review? This review already starts off interesting, or at least interesting to me.

Elantris, formerly Blackthorn, is a symphonic metal band out of Ohio that formed in 2014. One of their noteworthy points is how they recently toured with Lacuna Coil. The band’s new name is possibly taken from a novel of the same name, but that’s speculation on my part. What I can confirm is “This Sacrifice” is their debut album released sometime recently. I can’t seem to find anything else about them. I actually came across them in a Facebook group and they were looking for reviews to post. Naturally I’m drawn to bands with bits of mystery and thought I’d bite.

Here’s something that was interesting for me about buying this album. I searched for this album to purchase on iTunes (yes, I know you’re judging, and it’s OK. I am disappointed in myself too) and review only to find it wasn’t under their current name. It was still listed under their old name. If I recall you can find it under Elantris on Spotify and other platforms. Despite a minor incident, though, I finally got the album and gave it a listen.

The album kicks off with “Ellie”, and it barrages the listener with rhapsody of heavy tones tempered with a smooth synthesizer. One thing I really appreciated about the intro is how is gradually changes into a more complex time signature and gradually brings the listener into a battle march. I’ve come to expect many things to happen in symphonic metal, which includes complex meter, lots of bravado, but I didn’t expect other things from this song. The female vocalist was one of them. I’ll admit I’m pretty sheltered when it comes to symphonic metal but I’d grown accustomed to hearing vocalists with operatic or at least classical vocal training. The female vocalist has more of a pop star style. It is certainly different and while it jarred me at first I see how the style pairs well with the lyrics. The lyrical content was another aspect I didn’t expect. It felt like lots of angst came out with lines like “you don’t know me, you don’t know anything about me”, but again I see how it all comes together to something that foreshadows how the dark tones of the song are completely alluding to a dark nature. This dissonance carries throughout the album and adds elements that invoke doubt about the genuine nature of what’s presented without fully jeopardizing the composition of the songs.

Next up is “Ascension”, and it’s interesting to me in how it creates dissonance that’s ultimately cacophonous. It opens up with some black and heavy metal aesthetics of blast beats (though sometimes it slightly throws off the tempo), extreme vocals, and some shredding, but at times it seems to hearken back to the symphonic metal elements. At times it’s problematic as clearly the symphonic elements feel a little carelessly thrown in, though it’s clearly meant to bring a calming element to the song and allude to the lyrics about moving past terrible things. One moment where it’s problematic is when the transition from black metal to symphonic –or vice versa –prove slightly awkward as the blast beats either are a hare off or they drown out the vocals. When the same rhythm is transferred to other instruments it makes the other chord progressions awkward and feel thrown in to display skill rather than add to the song itself. Regardless of the problems I feel anyone can appreciate the powerful build ups and the earthy, aggressive tones of the instruments that pair with an airy, dolce voice. It’s as if the idea of whether the speaker can rise above the past is brought into question due to the speaker’s integrity.

Speaking of integrity I felt some parts of “Denied” may have lacked some of that. Each particular movement provides something powerful and provocative, but when placed together lacks anything cohesive to tie it together. One movement will have a powerful breakdowns paired with raw vocals and blastbeats, but other times it tries to take a legato turn with bittersweet tones. Sometimes there’s an attempt to transition between these movements with blast beats or with the synthesizer or arpeggios, but it ends up feeling out of place. I definitely see these things matching the lyrics where they sing about being broken or living moment to moment, but instead of fully conveying these ideas it feels like an awkward juxtaposition of things that were awesome that should make a song with no real agreement how to bring it together.

This disjointed composition seems to continue with other songs. Throughout “Forgotten” there are lots of things that, while cool, don’t cohesively mesh. I feel the lyrics, while superficially dark (and given the theme of things forgotten fitting) demonstrate why I personally don’t like end rhyming. Most people tend to place the end rhyming at the end of a line, and paired with the tendency for native English speakers to speak in an iambic rhythm, end up often with rhythm structure of “ba-dum, ba-dum, ba-dum-ba-dum baaaaah”. I personally feel that particular rhythm is generic and a go-to when writing on the fly. It doesn’t add anything to the song other than leave me grasping at straws to justify the composition. I feel, however, there is a lot of potential with this song as I do notice an attempt to tie things together. The spoken part meant to bridge back into the vocals, while falling into the trappings of end rhyming, allude the most lyrically to the feelings conveyed about forgetfulness and being forgotten. The synthesizer seems to be arbitrarily thrown in, but that’s because while there is a theme and variation with the rhythm it’s marred by the lyrics and the barrage of blastbeats. Everything feels like it’s built around them, though I’m guessing it was intentional as the things pointed out are overdone and make a song forgettable.

Following such a cliché song is a more redeeming song:”Project 000”. The composition is more complex and more cohesive and more to what I’m accustomed with symphonic metal. Overall this is a song that provides the listener with more of everything. There is a more fluid transition between the blastbeats and breakdowns in the song and the chord progressions not only compliment these moments fantastically but really emphasize the mood of the song. The harmonies even help convey some sort of humanoid creature in more blended vocals than previous tracks. The synthesizer is more purposeful with its contribution to the song. While the lyrics are still lacking it feels like turning this into a disjointed duet emphasizes the internal conflict of promises from an unknown versus the promise granted, more so than other tracks. This is a song that, if I had to pick a song for radio play, would top the list.

If “Project 000” was a promise of a more complex turn in the album it wasn’t a good one when followed by “Odium”. That’s not to say that it’s a bad song, but it starts off deviating slightly from their other songs and eventually succumbing to their formula. As with the previous song, it starts of with a slow tempo, but doesn’t jump in with blast beats. However it does go into the usual pattern of having screaming vocals paired with faster rhythms and the clean vocals paired with more legato themes. It also fell back into lyrically bludgeoning the listener with end rhymes, albeit it didn’t always fall into iambic rhythm. The clean vocalist wasn’t hitting the hitting all the notes when she needed to jump up in pitch, and I suspect has to do with the fact much of the time it was lyrically when it needed a strong emphasis on the consonants at the start of the word. This is a common issue with singing, which is why many pieces tend to compose pieces where lyrically the high pitches coincide with an emphasis on vowel sounds. It provides an easier jump between high and low pitches because it’s easier to do with sounds that are more “open” and have less to push through.

The next song completely deviates from the rest of their album, let along symphonic metal, by invoking sea tunes and djent in “Seas of Torment” in the first few minutes. It does goes back into their trademark blastbeats and screams followed by melodic, clean vocals, leaving their venture into pirate metal short lived. I understand why they’d invoke those elements with a title like that but as I said with other songs it didn’t seem cohesive, even with their album. I feel like everything else with this song I’ve covered in other songs so I’ll move on…

The next few songs I feel actually go together in some fashion so I’ll deal with “Strings of Silk”, “Dawn”, and “Captivate” together. “Strings of Silk” seems to be the expected fanfare from the album with the violin setting on the synthesizer until I heard “Dawn”. The first song sets a theme that is carried into the second. The dolce voice paired with the piano really lets not only the vocalist, but the band shine. We see lyrics and composition noted of symphonic metal but also the strengths of the band as a whole. This, in turn, segues into “Captivate”. It opens up to deliver all the punches in the form of blastbeats, screaming vocals, driving tempos, and clean vocals that only warn of more to come. The lyrics talk about leaving this as a standard at one point, and I couldn’t agree more. This is the climax and standard for the album.

The album finishes with the eponymous title “This Sacrifice”. It delivers the grittiness that we saw in previous songs paired with oftentimes ballad-eque movements and a fitting conclusion lyrically and musically to the album. Rather than being disjointed and sacrificing cohesive composition it seems this was thoughtfully pieced together, knowing full well this was to end the album. The ending brings everything together in an epic piece fit of the genre and leaves me hoping that Elantris continues in this direction for other albums.

Overall Elantris promises symphonic metal but delivers something out of the norm for the genre, be it breaking from traditional vocalists or surprising elements from other genres. The big problem this serves, however, is the tendency to lean towards what sounds cool rather than bringing everything together to make the song contribute something new to the genre. Instead of sounding like symphonic metal with other elements at times it sounds like people from several metal backgrounds coming together to try out symphonic metal and creating a hodge podge of a song. Once the band does commit to being a symphonic metal band, though, the results are amazing.


Album Review: “Nightingale” by Thirteen

Thirteen found me on Twitter and sent me one of those DM’s promoting their latest album “Nightingale”. I decided this would be my next album to review.

Thirteen is a hard rock band based out of DC and formed in 2015. Self-described as a cross between Black Sabbath and Guns n’ Roses, not to mention a plethora of other old school influences, the band formed out of a desire to keep hthirteennightingalealbumartard rock alive (long live rock!) and bring its legacy to the masses. Part of that quest manifests in their 2016 release “Nightingale”, which I understand is not only their debut album but won Best Hard Rock Album. While I wish they wouldn’t keep describing themselves this way as it did create some bias I feel I can get past it. Let’s dive in…

The album opens up with the eponymous song. While I see why they opened up with this song (more on that later), and it certainly has a strong Black Sabbath influence to bring in listeners, it probably wasn’t the strongest way to open. The vocals capture Ozzy’s voice very well with the way he sweeps his pitches and is atonal and his pitchiness. The rest of Thirteen captured the elements of those part of Ozzy’s solo career with simplistic composition and strong guitars. It certainly brings some atonal aspects that add some great dissonance, but it doesn’t seem to build up to anything. Tension is abound, but what should build up to a fantastic moment putters out. Based on the lyrics that focus on the speaker losing a loved one upon seeing the speaker’s dark side it may be an artistic choice to present it that way.

Leading into “In Her Mind” we get more of the same, only with more 90’s aesthetics. The song opens up with a basic drum line that’s compressed, a popular 90’s motif, along with references to femme fatale figures (Cleopatra, Medusa, etc.) and the Viper Room (while still around, the 90’s are definitely when folks remember it the most), and living fast and dangerously (which is probably why the Viper Room was referenced). I personally feel like the lyrics could have been reworked without sacrificing the rhythm structure. At times the lyrics feel a bit contrived with rhyming in order to fit this and at times the imagery suffers for it. I’ll use the example of the line “eyes like Medusa”. Are they insinuating her gaze turns people into stone? If so, how does that “see through you”? Is that how she “gets people in her mind?” The imagery doesn’t add up. Despite poorly constructed lyrics I found everything came together to provide a strong bass line that compliments the risky aspects of the song along with the rattling noise as if to suggest the “she” in the song is like a rattlesnake. I can only presume the woman in this song is the same one referenced in “Nightingale”, which is certainly an interesting aspect. I could see a different story unfolding, if that’s the case. Regardless I think folks will love this song and play it on their night out.

Next on the track is “Insanity” and it does change up the tracks up to this point. It doesn’t feel completely like 90’s hard rock and the lyrics seem to have a coherency to them to where the verses actually transition smoothly into the chorus. The minor keys add a somber tone to the lyric content of living fast combined with drug abuse. The short length of the song also adds a sense the subject of the song will soon (or is about to) hit a wall with fast lane life, whether intentional or not. One thing that I really enjoy about this is the vocalist is gritty and melodic and not forcing anything. I honestly get the feel this was easier for the vocalist to handle than trying to emulate Ozzy. There is also a great balance of guitars with the drums. The bass doesn’t overpower and the drums provide the structure that was missed in the other songs. The accents synchronize with the vocal accents resulting in stressing where the listener needs to find meaning. This is a song that not only I can foresee getting air time, but I think is more natural for Thirteen as a whole.

The album returns to the 90’s aesthetics with “El Diablo”. Guitar distortions, atonal tones, and ornamental interludes fill the song alongside demonic and dark imagery. One thing this song does which I enjoy is break away from the 90’s aesthetics with Spanish guitar even if it’s just to bookend before breaking into the 90’s theme again. I wish they did more with the Spanish elements instead of cramming it into the beginning. It felt contrived without it being more dispersed. Speaking of dispersed…

I’m not sure “I Let Go” was the right song to follow. It’s a slow, sentimental piece about missing love and possibly placed here as a juxtaposition of the wild nature of “the devil” to sentimental, tame elements of “the angel”. Ultimately it jars the pace of the album and doesn’t seem to contribute to that flow. Regardless, the song has many redeeming attributes. The acoustic aspects are very melodic and, when paired with the atonal vocals, sometime add to internal chaos felt by the speaker. While this is certainly one of the stronger pieces of the album, where one sees it start off as a rather flat piece in composition and then build into something more complex with layers of static sounds and eventually deviating from atonal to more harmonic chords, I feel like it’s missing something. I’m not quite sure what it is, though, as this is certainly another piece where I can discernibly say that is a direction Thirteen should take.

The album really deviates from everything it’s presented to the listener with “Dark Star”. Well, they keep the dark themes and tones of their music and that part works out. One sees when listening to this song why it follows the previous song: it’s down tempo and seems to follow the theme of endings. At the same time it’s hard to get behind this song as a music critic even though I personally enjoy it. The transitions are clunky at times, though the clunkiness pays off in lyrics like “to pull the trigger”. It feels like there’s supposed to be a theme and variation led by the drums, especially with the use of high hat, but I’m not sure where it leads. I also have personally a hard time with the pitch here. I’m all for atonal and singing that sounds off but isn’t, but the vocalist was trying to hit notes below his range. I could see where missing the notes could convey the idea of someone on a losing streak, but for me it was distracting.

Next up was “Time”, which was another song I felt was out of place on the album. I can see why it was included, but at the same time it didn’t fit the themes of the rest of the songs. It’s certainly a love song, one with lots of sentimental ideas presented and more major chord progressions than the other songs. It was also slightly more complex than the other songs, albeit subdued, in that the guitar riffs were slightly drowned out but still audible while everything else was simplistic. I appreciated the complex riffs but in trying to mix it with the other phrasing in the other parts made it awkward. This is one of those songs where letting each part shine will really drive the emotions behind the song.

Thirteen goes back to their similar themes and aesthetics with “Romeo’s Kiss”. At times the song reminds me of Mountain and I enjoyed that aspect. I was conflicted about this song in terms of rhythmic composition. On one hand I wanted this song to be more chaotic since we’re hearing about the perspective of a person spiraling out of control. This was encompassed well during the interlude as well. On the other hand I felt the off rhythm attributes didn’t pan out in my mind. It mostly occurred with parts where the end rhyming occurs (there is a reason I have issues with end rhyming. Part of my problem is forcing it to work with an already determined meter, and it ultimately doesn’t mesh. It’s a lose-lose situation). That said, there were some possible production issues with this song. I can’t tell if it’s my headphones but the kick drum’s levels felt like it was turned up too high during recording at times. In general it sounds like there were some difficulties with low ends on this song as it sounds really compressed or like someone hitting a mic. It’s odd as I don’t notice this anywhere else in the album prior.

Other than production deviations “Satin Doll” provides structurally something a little different. It provides no real transition between the different styles, so we get a bookend of driving guitar rhythms paired with a marching tempo then suddenly break into legato, melodious parts. At one point during the interlude these parts sort of combine but it’s still a little awkward without a transition. The lyrics are a bit better, and I personally like how it uses more ways to rhyme, such as slant rhyming and alliteration (“precious pain” followed by “love is just a game” comes to mind). The imagery, however, was still kind of weak. When I think of dolls I don’t think of them “drowning in a sea”. As a hard rock band there’s a lot of fun to be had by subverting the tough veneer with something like a doll. I personally would have tried to work that to something like “sewn up with whips and chains” or something to that effect. It still upholds much of the sexual and dangerous tension permeating the album. It also adds to the idea of the speaker going for more of the same when it comes to the female object of his desire: a figure that is somewhat femme fatale but equally damaged. As for the production I’m starting notice a bit of the same distortion issue with the drums and actually a bit of the vocals. This leads me to believe something wasn’t properly filtered during recording or levels were up too high. I’m not sure if this is some sort of artistic intention, but it comes off more as distracting from the song rather than something that adds to it.

The album ends on something of an ultimate bookend with “The Siren”, compared to the album staring off with “Nightingale”. Where the album starts off with losing a lover who couldn’t stand to see the speaker warts and all, we see something of a finale. We see everything from the album in this one song, from atonal gritty vocals to melodic tones about sexy dangerous women serving as a psychopomp through the underbelly world of the album. This is something that should have been prevalent in the entire album, or at least started off the album. It offers a lot for the listener and it keeps the hard rock influences without letting them overpower the band’s own creative forces. This is the song that delivers a punch to the eardrums that the listener thanks the band for providing.

Overall “Nightingale” is certainly a plethora of some early material. I understand the desire to bring hard rock back into music, but there is so much more for Thirteen to use than 90’s era hard rock. It has a rich history and one that is facing many challenges currently, namely with the demand for more complexity in music. I’m confident Thirteen can and will rise to that challenge. When they quit letting their influences completely dominate such as in songs like “Insanity” and “The Siren”, and possibly a bit in their songs like “Satin Doll” Thirteen delivers powerful chords tempered with melodic, yet biting lyrics. That said, Thirteen’s lyrics and composition do need some work. The composition will work out in time, again, when the band is willing to take the forefront of their own artistic image. I already see that in how they present something of a story of two (former) lovers whether intended or not and other themes of how love and risk can be intertwined. This no-bit critic will love to see how Thirteen develops their artistry and grow from here. Perhaps they’ll even spread their wings to fly like a bird.

Rating: 2.2/4

Opeth Builds a World of Nostalgia and Trance

Opeth has made waves in recent albums as longtime fans noted a change in theircreative direction.  Any time Opeth is mentioned it provokes the debate of whether or not it’s for the best.  Regardless Opeth still knows how to synthesize a visually appealing aesethetic and a set list bound to appease even the most stringent fan.

I won’t deny that there is a major difference between Opeth’s older music and their newer stuff.  It’s obvious.  Their newer stuff has more pronounced jazz and rock elements and subdued more modern aspects of metal.  I feel like much of it is a nod to music from the ’70s.  Given I really enjoy music from that era I see it as a boon.  What did make it feel like a ’70s throwback were the psychedelic visuals and emphasis on red and yellow lighting.  It certainly harkens to a different period, and I question the meticulous attention to detail.  There seems to be a clear purpose in going this direction but I can’t figure out if it’s for artistic or personal preference. 

 As for their older content it stands strong in its own merit.  Ot was amazing to watch the audience dynamic go from a subtle rocking out (at least compared to the rest of the night) to the same frenzy found with the other acts.  When the older songs were played the frenzy came out.  It even led to a few hilarious moments where Mikael Åkerfeldt demonstrated just how well he can handle hecklers.  That is the first time I saw anyone handle hecklers with deft and poise.

Opeth was able to handle more than just hecklers and visuals. The set list itself was created in such a way where the audience truly gets lost in the musical experience.  It may be the answer to my earlier ramblings about why the meticulous recreation of ’70s aspects.  I’ll be honest it was just as easy for me to get lost in the moment there as it is for me to get lost in ’70s music.  It may just be about creating an experience rather than any particular aesethetic.

Whatever the reason Opeth provides powerful music tempered by melodic tones.  In doing so it provides the audience an experience that permits not only getting lost in the music but a sense of nostalgia and, for me, lots of enjoyment.

Technique- 4


Audience Interaction-3

Brownie Points-0


Gojira Brings the Chaos and the Order

I was excited when I finally saw an opportunity to catch Gojira live.  I expected a high energy performance.  I didn’t expect some of what ensued later in the show.

Gojira’s music is best described as primordial on the verge of creation.  Everything from from soft vocals (though at times too soft) to building up to frantic blast beats synthesized to bring one to the edge and back constantly.  The musical dissonance shared with frantic drumming and at times haunting, distorted harmonies adds a nuiance and energy that leads one into chaos.  This chaos, however, is the kind where rather than fear it one embraces it and joins the frenzy.  
I made the horrible mistake of wandering too far into the mosh pit and suffered the consequences.  The high energy in the songs reflected in the intense moshing and body surfing that ensued and calmed when the music calmed.  At one point I’m pretty sure the mosh pit extended the entire section before the stairs.  I’m sure the band was aware of this, as everything fit so perfectly in their performance from visual effects timed just right to convincing nearly the entire audience to put their phones away and join the chanting.  I consider that a huge feat in today’s electronic times, and it enhanced the experience.  In spite of it being chaotic it brought everyone together to each other and to the music.

Gojira puts on a show equally intense as their music.  They know how to work their audience and bring them together to take the music to another level.

Technique- 3.9


Audience Interaction-3

Brownie Points-0


The Devin Townsend Project Brings a Tour de Force of Social Awkwardness 

This isn’t my first time reviewing The Devin Townsend project, but I will start it off probably the same way.  My bias in favor of them still stands.

Musically The Devin Townsend Project offers a plethora of styles, all of which deliver with tenacity and artistry only matched by a frontman who pokes fun at his own idiosyncrocies.  The powerhouse vocals tied together earth shaking drums and rolling bass lines deliver the poetics found in prog metal with the gritiness found in extreme metal.  This isn’t easy to pull off, and sometimes the timing was off due to excessive banter or missing the high notes.  Despite overdoing it to the point of hindrance that over the top embellishment added to the songs and brought something to folks already familiar with the work. 
 Not only was it more engaging, it was obvious the years of experience brought a clear command of audience interaction.  Whenever it seemed like he was losing the audience Townsend found a way to rile them up again, be it singing along, counting down to “March of the Poozers”, or cracking jokes about being out of place and a dad possibly out of his element.  Any mishap was handled by distracting the audience so well I didn’t even catch it (I only know it happened because he admitted to it, so kudos for getting one past me).  Even the sound quality was a far cry better than last time, which I would expect from a decent venue and incredible sound engineers.  

There was something that I felt was a little off about this area: the set list.  I honestly expected more from the “Transcendence” album, though I welcomed hearing music from “Z2” and older albums.  I also didn’t expect to hear songs like “Deadhead” so soon in the set list (that song was fourth if I recall).  I surmise that it had to do with the flow of the energy, which this set kept constant.  Regardless everyone had a good time, myself included.  

Technique- 3.65


Audience Interaction-3

Brownie Points-0.25


CS Luxem Shines Their Light (And It Didn’t Help My Migraine)

CS Luxem broke the monotony of ambient music in the night with their combination of music and social awkwardness. While it seemed odd it came together for an interesting show that provided the only fresh air that was in The Replay Lounge by that part of the night.

Luxem provided a nice break from all the ambient music with their combination of doo-wop paired with a strong bass line. Adding off-key vocals and some synth elements to the mix does max it interesting, though at times it felt a little hokey. I felt like at times there was too much in the mix that it was a bit of overkill, such as too strong of a bass line or too much reverb that seemed to serve no purpose. On a more positive note they remind me of a grittier 10 CC.

As I’ve said with other bands that night I’m giving some leeway about their performance as I couldn’t see the stage thanks to a tight crowd. I’m going to give them even more leeway because I started to feel ill and left in the middle of their set. I feel because of that they didn’t get a fair review without it, especially when I left it seems they really started to play their finer songs. What I did get to note was while sometimes over the top musically CS Luxem also delivered equally goofy stage antics. At times it came off a part of the act, but it also felt a little contrived as if trying to mask something.

The audience enjoyed the antics, though, and showed it with lots of cheering. Sadly this section is pretty sparse, which adds to why I’m giving them leeway. It’s not their fault, but at least the audience got to enjoy them.

As I’ve said CS Luxem combines doo-wop and synth with goofiness. What little I did review shows that while a bit rough around the edges can provide something unique and a bit reminiscent of 70’s and 80’s music. I hope to give them a more complete review in the future.


Technique- 2

Presentation- 1.5

Audience Interaction- 1

Brownie Points- 0.75

Total- 5.25